Monthly Archives: February 2014

Seller Credits Explained … Can You Pay for Buyer’s  Closing Costs?

Seller Credits Explained … Can You Pay for Buyer’s Closing Costs?

In general, most underwriting guidelines allow for the seller to pay a buyer’s closing costs. However, no matter what you negotiate, the amount of the credit at the closing table cannot exceed the buyer’s actual costs.

The following guidelines currently apply:

Conventional financing:

  • 90.01% + 3% credit
  • 90% or less 6% credit

FHA financing

  • 6% credit

VA financing

  • 4% credit

 

A seller should not give money back to the buyer at closing for repairs, decorating allowance, new carpet, etc. A closing cost credit is the only way for the seller to give money to the buyer without affecting the purchase price.

If a concession falls outside of these parameters, then the underwriter will subtract the dollar figure from the purchase price and run the loan to value ratio. If the ratio now exceeds the threshold for the loan program, the buyer may need PMI or not qualify for the loan program.

If you have a relocation customer whose company is paying their closing costs, then the amount of the seller concession will be limited. The buyer can not be reimbursed twice.

Closing costs are all of the buyer’s one-time fees associated with obtaining their mortgage. It does include escrows and pre-paids.

Allowable Costs:

Points Tax Service Fee

Appraisal Underwriting & Processing Fees

Credit Report Municipal Lien

Attorney’s Fee Plot Plan

Title search Recording & Courier Fees

Flood Certification First year’s insurance binder

Title Insurance Tax, Insurance & PMI escrows

For More Detailed Information feel free to call or email Tom Coburn, William Raveis Mortgage Broker, mobile: 508-380-7975  email: tom.coburn@raveis.com

Days on Market … Why do I Care?

Days on Market … Why do I Care?

Properties with great locations, perfect condition and priced at market value do not last on the market and thus their days on market are very short. You can use days on market (DOM)  statistics as a way of determining what the market (read that – buyers) think of any one of these three variables.  Typically, properties with a large DOM will command lower prices than a property with small DOM’s because buyers perceive the property as over priced or less desirable. DOM is often used when developing a pricing strategy. DOM can also be used as a “thermometer” to gauge the temperature of a housing market.That’s why you care about DOM.

Okay, so how is DOM figured?  In simple terms, DOM  is the number of days on the market that a property is “active” from the list date of the current listing. A home can be withdrawn from the market, a listing may expire or it may be taken “temporarily” off the market for completely valid reasons. The MLS stops counting days for any of the these reasons in addition to a property changing status to “under-agreement.” If a property then comes back on the market – BOM in MLS terms (a contract is voided for home inspection, financing, or some other reason) counting days resumes.

If a listing is taken off the market then comes back on the market more than 90 days later with a new MLS number  the DOM is reset to zero but the MLS continues counting days from the first (original) list date – called Property History. Agents used to cancel stale listings and put them on the next day with a different MLS number and buyers would think it was a “new” listing. But those days are over with the transparency of the internet … you can find out the true DOM easily.

In a buyer’s market, the DOM are generally higher because inventory takes longer to sell. In a seller’s market, the DOM are fewer.  In the current market conditions terrific homes in active price points are getting offers within 15 days.  Mediocre homes in those same price points are taking 30-180 days. And fixer-uppers/as-is/dated/bad location/overpriced homes in those same price points are taking much longer. There are currently 20 homes on the market in Metrowest that have DOM over a year, and one even has 1696 DOM (I hope that agent doesn’t need a paycheck).

Bottom line if you’re a seller, bringing a house to market it is vital that you bring it to market in the best condition possible, with good marketing and priced right. Anything less than that may put less money in your pocket.

Bottom line if you’re a buyer, pay attention to DOM and use it as a negotiating tool. Knowing it may put money in your pocket.

DO’s & DONT’s When Applying For a Mortgage

DO’s & DONT’s When Applying For a Mortgage

Okay, you’ve found a great home to purchase, but you’ve got to replace your car and your furniture is hand-me-downs from your grandparents. Before you start doing your duty to the God of Consumerism, here is some wise advice to follow:

DO’s

  • Notify your mortgage broker of income changes … any changes from when you applied need to be above board
  • Keep documentation of any large deposits … lenders will need to verify where you received the money from
  • Pay all your bills on time … keeping current on all existing accounts is extremely important
    (a single late payment 30 days could affect your credit score between 50 and 100 points and may change your mortgage rate)

DONT’s

  • Apply for new credit of any kind … credit scores will be requested and this will be recorded, your score could be adversely affected
  • Go over your limit on credit cards …try to keep your balance below 50% of your available credit limit on any/all of  your cards
  • Consolidate your debt over 1 0r 2 credit cards … appearance is reality, it will look like you’re maxed out on the remaining cards, again could adversely affect your credit score
  • Change or quit jobs … if anything – especially your employment changes from your initial application your approval may change or be revoked.

Your mortgage company will verify your employment and credit score approximately 2 days before the closing, so keep everything steady and calm and you’ll be fine and get that great home you wanted.

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